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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 133198
Last updated: 6 April 2019
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Date:14-MAY-1994
Time:23:04
Type:Silhouette image of generic P28R model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Piper PA-28R-200
Owner/operator:Parmenter, Russell E.
Registration: N56971
C/n / msn: 28R-7435066
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 2
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:San Antonio, TX -   United States of America
Phase: Approach
Nature:Private
Departure airport:GPT
Destination airport:
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
On May 14, 1994, at 2304 central daylight time, a Piper PA-28R-200, N56971, was destroyed when it collided with the ground near San Antonio, Texas. The airplane, owned and operated by the commercial pilot, was on a personal cross country flight. An IFR flight plan was in effect and instrument meteorological conditions prevailed. The pilot and the one passenger received serious injuries.

The airplane was en route from Gulfport, Mississippi, to the San Antonio area. There were thunderstorms throughout the area and the pilot elected to initiate an ILS approach to runway 12L at the San Antonio International Airport. Once he had broken out of the overcast, on the approach, the pilot requested and was granted permission to divert to his home airport which was about 12 miles north of the international airport.

The pilot stated that he had encountered turbulence during the approach and en route to the private strip. He said in his statement that he entered a right down wind for runway 16 and lowered the gear. He further stated that there was light rain, but, not "enough to hinder visibility. The next thing I remembered was being on the ground and stopped. I do not remember touching down or landing. Neither did Seaman (the passenger)." The pilot, who submitted a written statement, but failed to submit a Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident Report, stated that he believed he encountered a microburst that forced the airplane down.
PROBABLE CAUSE:THE PILOT CONTINUED FLIGHT INTO KNOWN ADVERSE WEATHER. THE THUNDERSTORM ACTIVITY WAS A FACTOR.

Sources:

NTSB id 20001206X01285


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
21-Dec-2016 19:25 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]

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