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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 133254
Last updated: 8 February 2019
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Date:06-JUN-1994
Time:10:30
Type:Silhouette image of generic G164 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Grumman G-164B
Owner/operator:Farmers Aerial Seeders Corp.
Registration: N8363K
C/n / msn: 6638
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Carlisle, AR -   United States of America
Phase: Manoeuvring (airshow, firefighting, ag.ops.)
Nature:Agricultural
Departure airport:
Destination airport:
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
On June 6, 1994, at 1030 central daylight time, a Grumman G-164B, N8363K, was destroyed during a forced landing near Carlisle, Arkansas. The commercial pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the aerial application flight.

According to the pilot, the airplane was dispensing fertilizer on an easterly heading at an altitude of 50 feet AGL, near the end of the rice field. The pilot further reported hearing a "loud cannon-like pop sound" coming from the engine, immediately followed by the complete loss of engine power.

The pilot added that at the point of the power loss, a line of tall trees was less than 1/8 of a mile ahead of the airplane. He elected to turn right into the wind while attempting to dump his load from the 400 gallon hopper.

The spreader assembly separated from the fuselage on initial contact with the ground. As the main landing gear sank into the soft muddy ground, the airplane went nose down and came to rest with the propeller spinner stuck in the ground.

According to the pilot's enclosed statement, fuel from the 97 gallon fuel tank on the top wing dripped down the cowling and into the engine compartment, starting a fire. Post-impact fire destroyed the airplane.

A detailed examination and teardown of the engine failed to disclose any anomalies that would have prevented normal engine operation.
PROBABLE CAUSE:THE LOSS OF ENGINE POWER FOR UNDETERMINED REASON. A FACTOR WS THE LACK OF SUITABLE TERRAIN AT THE PILOT'S DISPOSAL FOR THE FORCED LANDING.

Sources:

NTSB id 20001206X01523


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
21-Dec-2016 19:25 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]

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