ASN logo
ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 207617
Last updated: 18 September 2020
This information is added by users of ASN. Neither ASN nor the Flight Safety Foundation are responsible for the completeness or correctness of this information. If you feel this information is incomplete or incorrect, you can submit corrected information.

Date:15-MAR-2018
Time:13:35
Type:Silhouette image of generic C177 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Cessna 177 Cardinal
Owner/operator:Private
Registration: N713CX
C/n / msn: 17701121
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 3
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Substantial
Category:Accident
Location:near Key West International Airport (KEYW), Monroe County, FL -   United States of America
Phase: Initial climb
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Key West International Airport, FL (EYW/KEYW)
Destination airport:Key West International Airport, FL (EYW/KEYW)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
The airline transport pilot reported that the preflight inspection, engine start, taxi, and engine run-up were uneventful. During initial climb for the local flight, about 400 ft above ground level, the engine power suddenly reduced to idle. The pilot lowered the nose of the airplane and made a shallow left turn to avoid trees; however, the airplane contacted power lines and came to rest upright in a parking lot. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage. Examination of the wreckage revealed that adequate fuel remained on board and that fuel had leaked from the airplane after impact. During the examination, the fuel screen was removed from the fuel servo. Although some rust was observed on the screen and in the servo, consistent with the airplane sitting unused over a period of time, it is not likely that this had any impact on the operation of the engine. Further examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. Thus, the reason for the partial loss of engine power could not be determined.

Probable Cause: A partial loss of engine power during initial climb for reasons that could not be determined because examination of the wreckage did not reveal any evidence of preimpact malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20180315X43344&key=1
FAA register: http://registry.faa.gov/aircraftinquiry/NNum_Results.aspx?NNumbertxt=30208

Accident investigation:
cover
  
Investigating agency: NTSB
Status: Investigation completed
Duration: 1 year and 2 months
Download report: Final report


Images:


Photo: FAA

Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
15-Mar-2018 19:46 Captain Adam Added
15-Mar-2018 19:48 harro Updated [Aircraft type, Source]
15-Mar-2018 19:49 harro Updated [Aircraft type, Source]
15-Mar-2018 21:08 Iceman 29 Updated [Embed code]
15-Mar-2018 22:53 Geno Updated [Time, Cn, Location, Departure airport, Source, Embed code]
01-Jun-2019 07:27 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Departure airport, Destination airport, Source, Embed code, Narrative, Accident report, ]
01-Jun-2019 13:54 harro Updated [Departure airport, Destination airport, Source, Embed code, Narrative, Photo]

Corrections or additions? ... Edit this accident description