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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 39482
Last updated: 18 November 2021
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Date:25-MAY-1999
Time:17:20
Type:Silhouette image of generic M18 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
PZL M-18B Dromader
Owner/operator:Pitts Ag Flying Inc.
Registration: N8199W
MSN: 1Z027-25
Fatalities:Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Substantial
Category:Accident
Location:Altus, OK -   United States of America
Phase: Take off
Nature:Agricultural
Departure airport:OK83
Destination airport:
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
The Dromader was departing from an 1,800 foot runway with a 250 foot overrun. The airplane was estimated to be 273 pounds overweight, and the density altitude was 3,244 feet. The pilot had set his flaps at 9 degrees, although other operators of the Dromader recommended 15 to 20 degrees of flaps for heavy gross weight takeoffs. The manufacturer's performance charts indicate that 1,800 feet is needed for a 10 degree flap takeoff under these conditions. A witness said that the airplane's engine was running smoothly, but the ground run appeared unusually long, and he saw it hit a small earthen berm at liftoff. He said the airplane popped up, then down, up again, and then nosed over onto its back. The airplane was found with its left main wheel separated, the crew compartment collapsed, the gate box (dump doors) closed, and approximately 510 gallons of applicant in the hopper. The engine was test run in its fuselage and operated normally with the exception of a 'popping' noise heard on its fourth run. Two exhaust valves were found heat blued, and one of the valves had a rub mark down its stem suggesting that it might have been stuck on some occasion.
Probable Cause: The pilot's disregard of takeoff performance data and his failure to jettison the load. Contributing factors were high density altitude, exceeding the aircraft's maximum allowable gross weight, and the berm.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20001212X18743&key=1


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
24-Oct-2008 10:30 ASN archive Added
21-Dec-2016 19:23 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
26-Nov-2017 15:16 ASN Update Bot Updated [Operator, Departure airport, Source, Narrative]

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