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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 43769
Last updated: 29 July 2020
This record has been locked for editing.

Date:30-MAY-2007
Time:10:35
Type:Silhouette image of generic RV6 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Van's RV-6A
Owner/operator:Private
Registration: N39AJ
C/n / msn: 20065
Fatalities:Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 1
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Boerne, TX -   United States of America
Phase: Take off
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Boerne, TX (7TA8)
Destination airport:Houston, TX (KDWH)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
The commercial pilot lost control of the single-engine homebuilt airplane during takeoff from a private 2,300-foot long turf runway. An FAA safety inspector, who traveled to the accident site, performed an on-scene examination and documentation of the wreckage. Family members and neighbors witnessed the accident sequence. Some witnesses reported that the airplane appeared to have made a normal takeoff. At about 100 to 150 feet above the ground the airplane was observed to have attained a pronounced nose-high attitude, and subsequently rolled abruptly to the left as the airplane assumed a nose-low attitude. The airplane impacted the ground in the inverted position. A post-impact fire consumed most of the airplane. The wreckage of the airplane was recovered to a secured location for further evaluation. Flight control continuity was established to all flight controls. A detailed engine examination of the airframe and the engine failed to reveal any anomalies that could have prevented normal flight operation. The nearest weather recording station was the San Antonio International Airport (KSAT). At 1053 local, KSAT was reporting wind from 180 degrees at 10 knots, visibility 10 statute-mile, a broken layer at 2,400 feet, temperature 27 degrees Celsius, dew point 21 degrees Celsius, with an altimeter setting of 29.95 inches of Mercury. The density altitude was calculated at 3,126 feet msl.
.
Probable Cause: The pilot's failure to maintain the best angle of climb speed resulting in an inadvertent stall. A contributing factor was the high density altitude.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20070531X00675&key=1


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
28-Oct-2008 00:45 ASN archive Added
21-Dec-2016 19:24 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
28-Feb-2017 19:06 junior sjc Updated [Narrative]
04-Dec-2017 18:40 ASN Update Bot Updated [Operator, Other fatalities, Source, Narrative]