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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 43967
Last updated: 13 July 2020
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Date:01-NOV-2006
Time:11:18
Type:Silhouette image of generic BE76 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Beechcraft 76 Duchess
Owner/operator:Aussie Air
Registration: N6017U
C/n / msn: ME-159
Fatalities:Fatalities: 2 / Occupants: 2
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:Port Orange, FL -   United States of America
Phase: Approach
Nature:Training
Departure airport:Daytona Beach, FL (DAB)
Destination airport:Spruce Creek, FL (7FL6)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
During an instructional flight in a Beech BE-76, the flight instructor and student noted a total loss of power in the right engine. They declared an emergency to air traffic control (ATC), and initially flew toward their home airport, about 8 nautical miles away. The flight instructor and student pilot subsequently reported minimum fuel to ATC, and then diverted to a closer airport, as they believed that the airplane was about to lose power in the left engine. The airplane impacted a residential area about 1 nautical mile from the alternate airport. Examination of fueling records, operator records, and the student's pilot logbook revealed that the airplane flew about 3.3 hours since it was completely fueled; however, the operator records were incomplete, and any additional flights in the accident airplane during that time could not be verified. The airplane's fuel capacity was 103 total gallons, of which 3 gallons were unusable fuel. Review of engine manufacturer information revealed that each engine consumed about 10.5 gallons-per-hour at 75 percent power. Examination of the wreckage did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions, and no fuel was present throughout the fuel system.
Probable Cause: The flight instructor's inadequate preflight planning which resulted in fuel exhaustion.

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20061109X01632&key=1


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
28-Oct-2008 00:45 ASN archive Added
21-Dec-2016 19:24 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
05-Dec-2017 09:28 ASN Update Bot Updated [Other fatalities, Destination airport, Source, Narrative]

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