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Last updated: 19 September 2021
Status:Final
Date:Sunday 30 June 2019
Time:09:11
Type:Silhouette image of generic B350 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Beechcraft B300 King Air 350i
Operator:EE Operations LLC
Registration: N534FF
MSN: FL-1091
First flight: 2017
Total airframe hrs:691
Engines: 2 Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-60A
Crew:Fatalities: 2 / Occupants: 2
Passengers:Fatalities: 8 / Occupants: 8
Total:Fatalities: 10 / Occupants: 10
Aircraft damage: Destroyed
Aircraft fate: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location:Dallas-Addison Airport, TX (ADS) (   United States of America)
Phase: Takeoff (TOF)
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Dallas-Addison Airport, TX (ADS/KADS), United States of America
Destination airport:St. Petersburg-Albert Whitted Airport, FL (SPG/KSPG), United States of America
Narrative:
The Beechcraft 350i Super King Air was destroyed after impacting a hangar during takeoff from runway 15 at Dallas-Addison Airport (ADS/KADS), Dallas, Texas. A post-impact fire ensued. The ten occupants onboard received fatal injuries.
Inside the hangar a Dassault Falcon 900 jet (N908CA) and a helicopter sustained some damage.

The engines were starte at 09:03. In preparation for departure, the pilots did not call for the airplane’s Before Engine Starting, Engine Starting, Before Taxi, or Before Takeoff (Runup) checklists nor did they discuss any emergency procedures.
The pilot contacted ground control about 09:05 stating he was ready to taxi and was provided taxi instructions to runway 15. At 09:09:41, the local controller gave the pilot departure instructions to turn left to heading 050 and cleared the flight for takeoff from runway 15. A sound similar to an increase in propeller rpm was recorded about 09:10:11, and the co-pilot called "airspeed’s alive" at 09:10:25. Rotation occurred about 09:10:32 at a groundspeed of about 101 knots (102 knots calibrated airspeed).
The airplane fully lifted off the ground about 1,900 ft from the beginning of the takeoff roll at a groundspeed of about 105 knots (106 knots calibrated airspeed).
The pilots did not verbalize any V speeds before or during the takeoff roll. With the reported weather conditions (wind at 6 knots from 100° and temperature at 26°C) and at maximum takeoff weight, the takeoff decision speed (V1) for the flight would have been 106 knots, Vr (rotation speed) would have been 110 knots, V2 (takeoff safety speed) would have been 117 knots, and Vmc (minimum controllable airspeed) would have been 96 knots (with flaps retracted) or 94 knots (with the flaps at the approach setting of about 14º).
Six seconds after liftoff (09:10:40), the pilot stated, "what in the world?" The no.1 (left) engine had lost almost all thrust. At 09:10:43, the co-pilot stated, "you just lost your left engine." The airplane had passed over the left edge of runway 15 at this time. The pilot responded to the emergency with left rudder input, the opposite action of what the emergency called for. Seconds later, the pilot applied right rudder but by that point the airplane was rolling inverted, and there was insufficient altitude for recovery.
The stall warning horn and "bank angle" annunciator sounded as the aircraft rolled left after reaching a maximum altitude of 100 ft agl.
At 09:10:51, the sound of the airplane’s impact with the hangar was recorded. The airplane rolled to its left and impacted the hangar in an inverted attitude. The airplane then impacted the hangar floor, breached a closed roll-up garage door, came to rest on its right side outside of the hangar, and was consumed by fire.

A detailed examination of the left engine and its control systems found no condition that would have prevented normal operation. The NTSB noted that there was a known risk of an unintentional movement of an engine power lever if its friction lock was adjusted incorrectly. Friction lock settings are one of the items in a pre-takeoff checklist the pilot failed to use.
Investigators were unable to determine if the friction lock settings played a role in the loss of thrust on the left engine. The cause for loss of engine thrust could not be determined.

Probable Cause:

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The pilot’s failure to maintain airplane control following a reduction of thrust in the left engine during takeoff. The reason for the reduction in thrust could not be determined. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s failure to conduct the airplane manufacturer’s emergency procedure following a loss of power in one engine and to follow the manufacturer’s checklists during all phases of operation."

Accident investigation:
cover
Investigating agency: NTSB
Status: Investigation completed
Duration: 1 year and 11 months
Accident number: CEN19MA190
Download report: Final report

Classification:
Loss of control

Sources:
» dfw.cbslocal.com

METAR Weather report:
13:47 UTC / 08:47 local time:
KADS 301347Z 10006KT 10SM SCT014 24/20 A3006

15:02 UTC / 10:02 local time:
KADS 301502Z 08003KT 10SM SCT017 26/21 A3006


Photos

photo of Beechcraft-B300-King-Air-350i-N534FF
accident date: 30-06-2019
type: Beechcraft B300 King Air 350i
registration: N534FF
photo of Beechcraft-B300-King-Air-350i-N534FF
accident date: 30-06-2019
type: Beechcraft B300 King Air 350i
registration: N534FF
photo of Beechcraft-B300-King-Air-350i-N534FF
accident date: 30-06-2019
type: Beechcraft B300 King Air 350i
registration: N534FF
photo of Beechcraft-B300-King-Air-350i-N534FF
accident date: 30-06-2019
type: Beechcraft B300 King Air 350i
registration: N534FF
photo of Beechcraft-B300-King-Air-350i-N534FF
accident date: 30-06-2019
type: Beechcraft B300 King Air 350i
registration: N534FF
photo of Beechcraft-B300-King-Air-350i-N534FF
photo of Beechcraft-B300-King-Air-350i-N534FF
 

Map
This map shows the airport of departure and the intended destination of the flight. The line between the airports does not display the exact flight path.
Distance from Dallas-Addison Airport, TX to St. Petersburg-Albert Whitted Airport, FL as the crow flies is 1470 km (919 miles).
Accident location: Exact; deduced from official accident report.

This information is not presented as the Flight Safety Foundation or the Aviation Safety Network’s opinion as to the cause of the accident. It is preliminary and is based on the facts as they are known at this time.
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