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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 133878
Last updated: 26 November 2021
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Date:17-AUG-1996
Time:09:45
Type:Silhouette image of generic SS2T model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Ayres S-2R-T34 Turbo Thrush
Owner/operator:Riddell Flying Service, Inc.
Registration: N3095X
MSN: T34-174
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:1
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Category:Accident
Location:W. Helena, AR -   United States of America
Phase: Take off
Nature:Agricultural
Departure airport:HEE
Destination airport:
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
On August 17, 1996, at 0945 central daylight time, an Ayres S2R-T34, N3095X, registered to and operated by Riddell Flying Service, Inc., as a Title 14 CFR Part 137 flight, during takeoff near West Helena, Arkansas, was destroyed when it struck a vehicle. The commercial pilot received minor injuries and the driver of the vehicle sustained fatal injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local aerial application flight and a flight plan was not filed. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

Witnesses and local authorities reported that a VOR installation site was under construction at the Thompson-Robbins Municipal Airport; however, work was not planned on the day of the accident. A dump truck entered the ramp area and drove from a taxiway onto the departure end of runway 26. At the time that the truck entered the runway environment the airplane was on takeoff roll on the runway. The pilot veered the airplane in an attempt to miss the truck; however, the left wing of the airplane struck the cab of the truck. The integrity of the airplane's fuel tanks and hopper were compromised and chemical and fuel spilled onto the runway. Structural damage occurred to the wings, engine, propeller, and cockpit. The truck load was dumped onto the runway and the truck received structural damage as it was overturned.

During telephone interviews, conducted by the investigator-in-charge, and on the Pilot/Operator Report, the pilot and the operator reported that the airplane hopper contained methyl parathion. During the takeoff roll on runway 26, full power had been applied and about 1,500 feet down the runway, the tail of the airplane lifted from the runway as the airspeed accelerated toward an indicated airspeed of 65 knots for liftoff. At that time, the pilot observed a dump truck turn onto the taxiway that crosses the active runway. After the pilot decided that the vehicle was not going to yield and hold short of the runway, the pilot made a right bank and attempted to fly the airplane from the runway in an effort to avoid the collision; however, the left wing of the airplane struck the truck.

During telephone interviews, conducted by the investigator-in-charge, and on the enclosed statements and documents, personnel from the FAA Southwest Region, the Raytheon Service Company, and The Bradshaw-Clark Corporation, revealed the following information. Specifications for the construction of a VOR/DME on the Thompson-Robbins Municipal Airport, West Helena, Arkansas, which included a Subcontractor's Safety Guidance Manual, were prepared by the Raytheon Service Company for the FAA Southwest Regional Office at Fort Worth, Texas. The project specifications (copy enclosed) included in Division 1-General Requirements, 1-2.2.3.2 Site Access and Security, state in part: Access to the site will require travel on and across active runways and taxiways. The contractor shall furnish the following guidelines to all employees and suppliers:

1. AIRCRAFT HAVE RIGHT-OF-WAY OVER ANY VEHICLE. 2. BEFORE CROSSING OR ENTERING ON TO A RUNWAY OR TAXIWAY: A. COME TO A COMPLETE STOP. B. SEARCH FOR MOVING AIRCRAFT ON THE SURFACE. C. SEARCH FOR AIRCRAFT APPROACHING TO LAND. D. LOOK AGAIN TO MAKE SURE. E. PROCEED WITH CAUTION.

The Subcontractor's Safety Guidance Manual Paragraph 2.25 Airport Vehicle Operator Practices, states in part: The following is a general guide to what is usually demanded of a driver on airport property. The following guidelines shall be followed as a minimum:

2.25.2.2 Always yield the right of way to emergency vehicles and aircraft. 2.25.2.3 Keep away from aircraft. 2.25.2.4 Never proceed onto a runway without proper authorization.

The project specifications indicated the construction work schedule was Monday through Thursday, 10 hours per day, with a start time of 0700. Construction airport routing (copy enclosed) brought the vehicles across the airport ramp and onto the taxiway that subsequently crossed the departure en

Sources:

NTSB id 20001208X06502


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
21-Dec-2016 19:26 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]

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