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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 21556
Last updated: 18 November 2021
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Date:20-JUN-2008
Time:14:00
Type:Silhouette image of generic SS2T model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Ayres S-2R-G6 Turbo Thrush
Owner/operator:Swan Lake Flying Service, Inc.
Registration: N61374
MSN: G6-119
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 1
Aircraft damage: Substantial
Category:Accident
Location:Pine Bluff, AR -   United States of America
Phase: En route
Nature:Agricultural
Departure airport:Altheimer, AR (NONE)
Destination airport:
Investigating agency: NTSB
Narrative:
The pilot was spraying a rice field with fertilizer when the "airplane began to lose altitude." The pilot attempted a forced landing in an open bean field. During the forced landing the airplane's right wing struck a tree, spinning the airplane around to the right. The airplane then impacted the terrain sideways, shearing off the landing gear, bending both wings, and buckling the fuselage. An examination of the engine showed evidence indicating the engine was not operating prior to impact. Additionally, the examination showed nothing that would have caused a loss of power or an in-flight engine shutdown. Further investigation determined that the airplane had previously experienced an uncommanded engine shut down. According to the wiring system schematic, the manufacturer did not install engine speed switches to automatically and electronically control the fuel system, but instead, installed pilot-activated switches for manual control of the fuel system. Examination of the system showed evidence of a short in the wires to the switch. The manufacturer stated that if a short in the wires occurred or if a switch failed due to contamination or corrosion, voltage could be sent to pin "B" on the Fuel Shutoff (Solenoid) Valve, causing the fuel shutoff valve to close.
Probable Cause: A total loss of engine power due to fuel starvation as a result of an electrical short in the wiring to the manual fuel switch that closed the fuel valves.

Sources:

NTSB

Accident investigation:
cover
  
Investigating agency: NTSB
Status: Investigation completed
Duration: 1 year 1 month
Download report: Final report
Location


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
05-Jul-2008 12:28 Fusko Added
21-Dec-2016 19:14 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
21-Dec-2016 19:16 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
21-Dec-2016 19:20 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
03-Dec-2017 11:21 ASN Update Bot Updated [Other fatalities, Departure airport, Source, Narrative]

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