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ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 225249
Last updated: 16 October 2021
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Date:14-MAY-1939
Time:day
Type:Short Stirling Mk I
Owner/operator:Short Brothers Ltd
Registration: L7600
MSN: S.900
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 4
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location:Rochester Airport, Rochester, Kent -   United Kingdom
Phase: Landing
Nature:Test
Departure airport:Rochester Airport, Rochester, Kent
Destination airport:Rochester Airport, Rochester, Kent
Narrative:
On 14 May 1939, the first Short S.29, which had by this point received the service name "Stirling" after the Scottish city, performed its first flight from Shorts Flight Test Base at Rochester Airport, Rochester, Kent. The first prototype was outfitted with four Bristol Hercules II radial engines, and was reported as having satisfactory handling. At the controls was a crew of four: Shorts Chief Test Pilot, John Lankester Parker, 2nd Pilot Esmond J. Moreton and two flight engineers.

However, the entire programme suffered a setback when the first prototype suffered severe damage and was written off as a result of a landing accident at Rochester at the end of its first test flight, in which one of the brakes locked, causing the aircraft to slew off the runway and the landing gear to collapse. The resulting damage was so severe that the aircraft was scrapped, and all components salvaged were used to speed up the building of the second prototype, L7605, which first flew on 3 December 1939. The failure was traced to the light alloy undercarriage back arch braces which were replaced on succeeding aircraft by stronger tubular steel units.

Sources:

1. Royal Air Force Aircraft L1000-N9999 (James J. Halley, Air Britain)
2. Norris, Geoffrey. The Short Stirling, Aircraft in Profile Number 142. Windsor, Berkshire, UK: Profile Publications Ltd., 1966.
3. The Stirling File (Bryce Gomersall, Air Britain, 1979 p.7 & p.31
4. Short Stirling: The First of the RAF Heavy Bombers By Pino Lombardi
5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short_Stirling#Prototypes
6. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claude_Lipscomb#Short_Stirling
7. http://www.pegelsoft.nl/proto.htm


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
19-May-2019 16:15 Dr. John Smith Added
19-May-2019 16:16 Dr. John Smith Updated [Narrative]

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