Accident Sommer Monoplane , 10 Jun 1912
ASN logo
ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 58991
 
This information is added by users of ASN. Neither ASN nor the Flight Safety Foundation are responsible for the completeness or correctness of this information. If you feel this information is incomplete or incorrect, you can submit corrected information.

Date:10-JUN-1912
Time:
Type:Sommer Monoplane
Owner/operator:Albert "Kiki" Kimmerling
Registration:
MSN:
Fatalities:Fatalities: 1 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Written off (damaged beyond repair)
Location:Reims, Mourmelon -   France
Phase: Initial climb
Nature:Test
Departure airport:Reims
Destination airport:Reims
Confidence Rating: Information is only available from news, social media or unofficial sources
Narrative:
This was the accident in which ice hockey and pilot pioneer, Albert "Kiki" Kimmerling, was killed.

On June 10, [some say June 2 or June 9] 1912 in Reims (Mourmelon), France, only 12 days before his 30th birthday he was test flying a new airplane, a two-seater, a Sommer Monoplane designed by a gentleman named Tonnet. Léon Bathiat, an excellent pilot himself and an associate of professor/airplane builder Roger Sommer asked Kimmerling to pilot the new plane. According to eyewitnesses the plane was very unstable as soon as it took off, shaking violently. Kimmerling reached a height of 300 metres [more probably 30] when the plane suddenly plummeted and crashed to the ground after a wing had detached from the plane. Kimmerling was killed instantly and both the hockey and aviation world lost a great sportsman, a true pioneer in both fields.

Sources:

1. Albert "Kiki" Kimmerling - An ice hockey and pilot pioneer


Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
19-Mar-2009 14:36 Topaz Added

Corrections or additions? ... Edit this accident description

The Aviation Safety Network is an exclusive service provided by:
Quick Links:

CONNECT WITH US: FSF Facebook FSF Twitter FSF Youtube FSF LinkedIn FSF Instagram

©2023 Flight Safety Foundation

701 N. Fairfax St., Ste. 250
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
www.FlightSafety.org